Preston — a Miracle Boy!

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I still remember the day I was told Preston had autism. At that time the only thing that I knew about autism was the name. I didn’t know what it was, what caused it, or what it meant for my son’s future. I had an older child who had hit his milestones pretty quickly, except for talking. My oldest son had hearing loss and needed tubes, but then learned to speak and hasn’t stoped since. Preston was born a happy and healthy baby, but he was late doing everything — crawling, walking, and talking.

I took him to the doctor and found out that he had severe ear infections but he showed no symptoms and never acted like he was in pain. He had tubes put in his ears and I thought he would be like my oldest and just start talking. It wasn’t until I started doing some research on my own that I began wondering if something else was wrong. I made an appointment for an evaluation. The day finally arrived, and by the end of the day I got what I thought was the worst news in the world: Preston had autism.

I still remember that day like it was yesterday and I still find myself crying sometimes. Preston is now five. He’s been in a special school for children with autism for almost three years now, and the change in him is almost a miracle. He’s getting everything he could possibly need — PT, OT, group and sensory therapy and all sorts of other things. Preston has finally come out of his shell. I remember that at age four he looked at me and finally said “Mom.” I cried. I had waited for four years to hear that word. Now he’s getting ready for public school, and things couldn’t be better.

Kylie Gafnea
Northport, AL

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