The Dramatic Story of How a Teen with Autism Saved His Mom’s Life

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Despite breaking his hand, an 18-year-old Long Island man with autism saved his unconscious mother from their vehicle before it burst into flames.

Tyler Gianchetta was riding with his mother, 50-year-old Susan Gianchetta when Susan stopped responding to him. She soon began to shake, then she blacked out and drove the car into a tree, according to WABC-TV. Tyler acted quickly to ensure his mother’s safety by pulling her out of the car. As Tyler struggled to save his mom, the car burst into flames.

Due to Tyler’s quick and decisive actions, his mother suffered only minor burns from the car fire. Susan was later transported to a local hospital in serious condition with broken bones and internal injuries from the accident. She is expected to make a full recovery. Tyler suffered a broken hand, but he was uncertain whether this occurred as a result of the car accident or his efforts to rescue his mother. The cause of Susan’s blackout remains undetermined.

Tyler’s father, Michael Gianchetta, called his son a hero following the accident and described him as a “special kid” who has faced the challenges of autism to become an honor student in his freshman year of college. Tyler, however, said, “I’m not a hero yet until I know she’s OK.”

Tyler credits pure instinct for his quick actions in the accident, according to CBS New York. “Don’t let her die,” Tyler said, “That’s all I’m thinking.” Tyler’s strength and determination help him to support his mom as she travels the long road to a full recovery from the accident. “I know she’s alive, that’s step one. Get her OK, that’s step two,” Tyler said.

Are you inspired by Tyler’s story and bravery? Visit The Autism Site’s Stories of Hope to learn about more strong, powerful individuals with autism and see the positive impact they have on their communities.

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