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This Dad Makes His Home a Mock Restaurant to Help His Son Who Has Autism

Michael Stuart’s 24-year-old son, Aaron, tried to find a job in food service or hospitality, but he found it difficult because he has severe autism. Job placement and training organizations weren’t able to help Aaron, so Michael took matters into his own hands. Starting with a mock restaurant, Michael has since developed an organization to help even more people with autism get the training they need.

Wanting to help his son develop the skills necessary to live his own life, Michael made a big decision. He retired from his teaching position and turned his home’s second story into a mock restaurant, because what better way to train Aaron than to put him in the same situations he can expect to encounter?

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In this mock restaurant, Aaron learns basic restaurant and hospitality skills, and he trains for six hours a day. As Michael trained his only his son, he launched Operation Meaningful Life. According to The Mighty, Operation Meaningful Life is a training program that focuses solely on developing skills and helping people reach their potentials.

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In an interview with Fox News, Michael emphasized his belief in investing in adults who are physically and intellectually disabled. The benefits of providing educational programs for these adults are obvious—instead of relying on adult care programs and support from the government, they’re able to work and support themselves. Training programs like Operation Meaningful Life help adults with autism become productive members of society, giving those adults a purpose in life.

Operation Meaningful Life isn’t the only organization helping adults with autism learn the skills they need to work and make a living. Learn more about creating meaningful jobs for people with autism.

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The Autism Site is a place where people can come together to support people who are affected by autism spectrum disorder. In addition to sharing inspiring stories, shopping for the cause, and signing petitions, visitors can take just a moment each day to click on the red button to provide therapy for children and families living with autism spectrum disorders. Visit The Autism Site and click today - it's free!