Don’t Believe the Hype; This “Cure” for Autism Is Actually Deadly

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Currently, science has not devised a cure for autism. Anyone who claims there is should be ignored. Because in some cases, so-called “cures” for autism are actually dangerous. Miracle Mineral Solution (MMS) is one example that has been gaining traction in several countries.

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The solution was formulated by Jim Humble from Genesis II Church—a U.S.-based, nonreligious organization of “health and healing.” Along with autism, the alternative medicine claims to cure Alzheimer’s, cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

This “cure” is not just fake; it’s poison. Delivered either orally or via enema, the “medicine” is a toxic mix of sodium chlorite and hydrochloric acid. When diluted with juice (as instructed), the chemicals combine to form chlorine dioxide—which is essentially an industrial strength bleach used to strip textiles.

In terms of autism, at least, it supposedly clears out parasites and worms that “cause” the disorder (though the cause of autism is likely multi-faceted and highly complex). In reality, MMS can lead to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and gut damage. With extended use, it can be lethal. One fatality has already been reported.

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“The so-called parasites that come out with the stools after the enemas is the intestinal lining, which sheds during the invasive and painful enema administration,” said Fiona O’Leary, a member of an autism non-profit called Autistic Rights Together, which is based in Ireland.

The FDA banned the phony medicine in 2010, but it’s still readily available online. It’s spread across the world—most recently to Great Britain, where one woman allegedly used it to try curing her son’s autism. Make no mistake, however: MMS is illegal, and many have claimed it is child abuse.

While there is no cure for autism, there are safer, evidence-based ways to treat it, namely through therapy. You can help provide therapy to kids with autism in military families. Read on to learn more.

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A. Stout received a Bachelor of Arts in Writing through Grand Valley State University, graduating Magna Cum Laude in 2015. In addition to being a passionate autism advocate, she is a member of various fandoms, a study abroad alumna, and an animal lover. She dreams of publishing novels and traveling all over the world someday.